New Trier Student, Strength Training

Strength Training For Your Health

Muscular strength and endurance, also known as muscular fitness, are components of fitness (along with cardiorespiratory fitness, flexibility, and appropriate body composition) that are important for overall health and well-being.

Benefits of Muscular Fitness

  • Increased physical work capacity (increased functional ability) resulting in improved ability to perform activities of daily living
  • Increased bone density
  • Increased fat-free mass resulting in decreased sarcopenia (age-related muscle mass loss) and potentially resulting in increased metabolism
  • Increased strength of connective tissue
  • Decreased risk of injury
  • Increased motor performance
  • Enhanced feeling of well-being and self-confidence
  • Improved quality of life

Circuit Weight Training

(resistance exercises performed one after the other without rest for approximately 20 minutes or more) may result in the following benefits.)

  • Modest improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (about 6%)
  • Improved glucose tolerance
  • Modest reductions in resting blood pressure
  • Improved blood lipid

 

A large majority of studies show that performing a single-set program to fatigue results in improvements in strength, endurance, and muscle hypertrophy. (increased size) It’s been proven over time, any  fitness program lasting more than (60) minutes per session offer higher dropout rates.  This is why in our strength training classes and our personal group training we follow a regimen that will increase strength and protect your joints and tendons, by reducing the amount of reps and increasing the weight to cause momentary muscle fatigue.

Functional Exercise, The concept of functional exercise simply refers to the idea that muscles should be trained and developed in such a way as to make the performance of everyday activities easier, smoother, safer, and more efficient. In other words, attention should be given to exercises that enhance everyday movements, and thereby improve your ability to “function independently” in the real world.

We are all aging, and if you are over 30 you are most likely not training for the Olympics. You are training to keep you body in peak condition for “Aging Properly”. Which brings us to Posture Weights“.  I developed posture weights for my senior classes when I realized this type of weight workout will benefit those who are younger too!  Since poor posture is one of the first things I  notice with all my students, it only made sense to put it to work when working with weights. When working with new students, or older, posture weights is harder but very safe for those who are still learning how to lift weights properly. Posture weights reduces the chance for poor form.

NQWC

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: ,

No comments yet.
%d bloggers like this: